Category: Mrs. B

SAY IT RIGHT

A Charlotte anchor/reporter gets us going today. Part of his e-mail to Mrs. B made her juices flow: Now what do we do with ...

SAY WHAT?

Let’s go over a few pronunciation stumbles today. From Hartford we get this: “…. the word THE. I always thought it is pronounced THUH ...

SAYING IT CORRECTLY

Let’s go over a few commonly mispronounced words and send you on your way. The pronunciation of “vice versa” gets battered every now and ...

TAKING LIBERTIES

Mrs. B is a long-standing George Strait fan. When George sings, “Where it’s at,” she can deal with it. Outside the context of a ...

ANXIOUSLY EAGER

Let’s spend just a little time on “anxious” and “eager” because I’m anxious about it, but I’m eager to move on to “different from” ...

BEING POSSESSIVE

Possessive pronouns have no apostrophe: hers, its, theirs, yours, whose, oneself. “Who’s” means “who is.” “There’s means “there is.” “It’s” is the contraction for ...

HIGHLY IRREGULAR

Irregular verbs can be stumpers. Use your dictionary if you aren’t sure what the past tense or past participle is. “See, saw, seen” is ...

WAS/WERE

When to use “was” and “were” is usually pretty easy. If the subject is singular, use the singular verb “was.” Example: “The tape was ...

MRS. B. IS HOPEFUL

“Hopefully” is widely used to mean “I hope” or “we hope,” or “it is hoped.” That’s not only wrong, it’s silly! And you’ll probably ...

MALAPROPS AMONG US

We continue today with our lesson on malapropisms: words we often confuse because they sound alike. “evoke” and “provoke” “Evoke means to bring to ...

A RECURRING UPDATE

A recurring mistake begins today’s lesson. The other day we heard a radio announcer say “re-occurring,”  as in “I have a re-occurring dream in ...

THE RIGHT WORD

Mrs. B recently heard an anchor talk about a suspect being extradited “back” to Central Florida. “Extradite” means to return to a jurisdiction, so ...

O, THE IRONY!

“Irony” and “ironic” are a couple of words we occasionally use in copy. But are we using them correctly? We heard of a local ...

HOW TO SAY IT

Mrs. B hopes you’ll pay close attention to your pronunciation of these words. mastectomy: muh-STEK-tuh-mee, not muh-SEK-tuh-mee (Don’t leave out the first “t.”) preventive: ...

HERE’S HOW YOU SAY IT

Let’s get started on another list of often-mispronounced words. dilate: DIE-LATE, not DIE-uh-LATE (It’s a two-syllable word.) drowned: DROWND, not DROWNDED (It’s a one-syllable ...

MERV KNOWS…

In newswriting you’re always better off using short words in short sentences. It’s the most effective way to tell a story. Newswriting coach Merv ...

KEEP IT SIMPLE

Instead of wordy phrases, Mrs. B hopes you’ll start simplifying. Try these on: Instead of “as a means to,” say to. Instead of “by ...

SKIP THE 25-CENT WORDS

Using 25-cent words doesn’t necessarily make you sound smarter. Usually the most effective language is the simplest. Mrs. B could “initiate” her lesson with ...

MRS. B vs. VERSUS

“Versus” is a preposition that means “against” in sports. In other contexts it means “as opposed to” or “in contrast to.” Notice there is ...

TO EACH HIS OWN

Each is always singular when it is the subject or comes before the subject it modifies. And these pronouns follow the same rule: every ...

**migrants, refugees*

The terms "migrant" and "refugee" are sometimes used interchangeably, but there's a crucial legal difference between the two. Migrants leave home voluntarily to try ...

Mrs.B-Archive-10-24-2017

?Continuously? means uninterrupted. ?Continually,? on the other hand, means frequently repeated. When Mrs. B hears "Well have continuous coverage of this story," she has ...